Monday, February 19, 2018

Vegetable Kadhi, and Many Doggy Pics

Among our favorite warming meals of winter- soups, dals and coconut curries- is the yogurt and besan (chickpea flour) based kadhi. My favorite style of kadhi is the mild, sweet, white Gujarati version but I haven't nailed down a recipe for it yet. Let me know if you have a good recipe for this style of kadhi. I've asked two close friends who happen to be Gujarati and they both claim that they don't like that sweet kadhi (ditto for the sweet Gujarati dal) and only ate it as kids when they were forced to. Sigh.

The current house favorite is this version, yellow with turmeric, with an aromatic tempering of several whole spices that just "makes" the dish. Basically you round up all the seeds in the spice cabinet and put 'em in there.

I add plenty of vegetables to the curry to make it a one-pot meal. This time I added carrots and those flat, broad Italian green beans (a freezer staple in my kitchen). Other vegetables that work well here: cauliflower, green beans, bell peppers, eggplant.

Vegetable Kadhi



1. Heat oil in a deep, heavy pot.

2. Temper it with
  • Mustard seeds
  • Hing (asafetida)
  • Curry leaves
  • Minced green chillies/ red chili powder/ broken dried red chillies
  • Turmeric
  • Cumin seeds
  • Fennel seeds
  • Coriander seeds
  • Fenugreek seeds
  • Nigella seeds

3. Add salt to taste and about 4 cups vegetables. I used carrots and frozen Italian green beans (the broad flat ones). 

4. Cover and let the vegetables cook until almost tender. Meanwhile, mix 2 cups yogurt, 1 cup water and 1/4 cup besan. Whisk together into a smooth paste.

5. Add the yogurt mixture to the veggies and simmer on low heat, covered, until the veggies and besan are cooked through. Garnish with cilantro if desired and enjoy! 

* * *

Our beloved pup Duncan turned 5 in December. His predecessor Dale got plenty of airtime on this blog, being the only child and all, while Duncan is the poor neglected middle child (not really) and I rarely get around to featuring him here. This weekend was the Chinese lunar new year ushering in the Year of the Dog, so this is a good time to post a few pictures of Dunkie.

Dunkie is an extra large dog (tipping the scale at 103 lbs) with a heart that is three sizes too big. He is seriously patient with our toddler. "Guckie" (Dunkie) was one of Niam's first words. He even learned to stand up by holding on to Duncan. Our boy is all over Duncan in his clueless and overwhelming toddler enthusiasm.  Dunkie puts up with it, and if it gets too much, he just shakes off the toddler and walks away. We practice "gentle hands" on Dunkie at every opportunity.

Dunkie has discovered that there is an upside for having a pesky toddler for a brother. Niam demands "Guckie kee-koo" (Dunkie cookie) every few hours- meaning a cookie that he can hand-feed the dog. Plus there are lots of tasty table scraps raining down by the high chair at every mealtime.

A kid and his dog
Dunkie is our one dog petting zoo. Wherever he goes, people swarm around, asking to pet him. People always think he is some exotic breed and are shocked to hear that he is a rescued dog and a one of a kind mutt. In that way he is an ambassador for shelters everywhere which are full of beautiful dogs just waiting for a home. Here are some pics of Dunkie doing what he does best.

Always with a slightly worried
hound dog expression

Snoozing on the biggest pet bed
I could find

His favorite spot in the world

His second favorite spot in the world:
the dog park
Waiting patiently for a treat

Enjoy the week! What are you cooking this week? Tell me about the pets in your life.

39 comments:

  1. I absolutely love kadhi, in all its variations. These days I make a simple version. Blend yogurt, besan, salt, sugar, turmeric, lal mirchi powder and dhania-jeers powder (optional). Set it to boil. Once the besan is cooked, add the tempering ( oil, mustard seeds, asafetida, Kashmiri lal mirch powder, curry leaves)

    For the Gujju version, try Tarla Dalal’s recipe ( original, not made by someone else on her website).


    I ♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️ Vaghoba!
    Lila and Niam are he luckiest kids, ever.

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    1. Manasi- Your recipe sounds easy peasy and I will give it a try! Oh and yes, Tarla Dalal has awesome Gujarati recipes, will try that as well.

      Yes, we are indeed very lucky that this vaghoba ended up in our life somehow. I do think it is very special for kids to grow up with pets.

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  2. I love kadhi, but we are a vegan household... and so I mourned the loss of Kadhi from my life. Until my friend introduced me to Coconut Milk Kadhi, and now I am happy again. :)

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    1. How about Sindhi kadhi, Lakshmi, it has besan and veggies but no yogurt. Or even Maharashtrian pithale, it is vegan and so tasty and comforting, very much in the kadhi genre.

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    2. Will look up some recipes, thanks!

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  3. Your little big Duncan has the sweetest worried-dog expression ever.

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    1. He does :) He is perplexed at this crazy world around him.

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  4. What an appropriate post at this time of year Nupur. But then any season is "kadhi" season. I make three types - Punjabi with pakoras ( since I was born and raised in Delhi), Gujrati kadhi that is sweet as my grandparents were from Baroda and of course Marathi - by adding cucumber. There's everything to love about kadhi bhaat or kadhi khichadi!
    And the baby language of Niam, what he does with Duncan and all photos - simply adorable.
    Does Lila still remind you to get a girl kitten ( gender balance in the family!)
    Growing up we had three dogs but I never got a pet here because everywhere we lived, our neighbours' pets adopted us! So we've been really lucky. Now the younger son gets his sister in law's dog at the weekends to baby sit and he brings Buddy (aka The Budster) to our house and it is a joy to have him around.
    Look forward to more posts.

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    1. Dear Shubha- Nothing like kadhi pakoda! The juicy toothsome veggies in this kadhi recipe that I've posted remind me of the pakoda wali kadhi. I've never heard of cucumber in kadhi! So many excellent variations on the theme. I love khichi kadhi as well, but in my parents home, the combo of tomato saar and khichdi is legendary.

      How sweet of you to love on the dogs of your neighbors and extended family! I know I appreciate it very much when friends and neighbors look out for Dunkie.

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  5. Duncan is adorable .. and wears his big heart in his eyes :) . My 14 year old golden too can easily fit that description . He is simply the best person I know :) .
    Jo

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    1. Hi Jo- Hugs to your 14 year old golden. That's a grand old man right there. And yes, someday I hope to be a good person like my dog.

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  6. I had a disastrous kadhi making experience 15 years ago--the yogurt wasn't sour enough and I think I let it boil too long and I used too much besan in a misguided attempt to increase the protein content. Haven't tried it since. You make it sound so easy, hmmm...

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    1. Niranjana- oh dear, I can imagine it, the mixture must have cooked up thick and burnt right on the pot. If you like a dish that's heavy on the besan, do try the Maharashtrian pithale. Trick is to simmer it on fairly low heat and stir often. But this recipe is worth a try.

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    2. Do you have a recipe to share for the pithale? (crossing fingers)

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    3. Here you go, a recipe written more than a decade ago. It is very humble peasant food but oh so comforting.
      http://onehotstove.blogspot.com/2006/01/p-is-for-pithale.html

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    4. Thank you thank you thank you, Nupur!

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  7. Hi,

    Love love the pics!! This-just made my day.

    I make a simple version of the Gujarati kadhi (probably not authentic - but tastes yumm). Add ghee to the pot and once heated through add a tempering of jeera, methi seeds and mohri (rai) seeds. Then add hing. Slit green chillies length ways (add per your spice preference) add the green chillies and curry patta to the tempering.
    Keep the yoghurt mix handy (blend together curd, besan, salt and sugar) and add to the tempering. Let the kadhi boil through. Garnish with coriander leaves.

    I love this version of the kadhi... khatta meetha as we call it...

    Enjoy the rest of your week...

    Meenal

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    1. Meenal- Glad you enjoyed the pics :) I guess the trick to a good kadhi is plenty of sugar! Thanks for sharing your recipe.

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  8. Try this recipe for kadhi - http://thespicewholovedme.blogspot.in/2007/03/gujarati-series-kadhi.html
    I thought it was very authentic tasting. But I always add cinnamon stick and cloves in the tempering because I believe it is what gujarati people do.

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    1. Oh yes, Nikita, Trupti's blog! I'll have to try this recipe, she had some really great recipes on her blog. I agree with you that the tadka needs cinnamon stick and cloves, that's the way I have always had it in the Gujarati thalis in Mumbai (my gold standard for Gujju style kadhi).

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  9. There are 3 kadhis i like.. the gujarathi one ( still hunting for the perfect recipe like you) , mom made plain besan yogurt kadhi that we licked clean with split moong khichadi n the best of all Sindhi kadhi.. its absolutely delicious

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    1. Anjali- I've yet to try making Sindi kadhi but will do so soon!

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  10. Duncan is adorbs!
    For Gujarati kadhi, I blend 2 cups yogurt, 2 cups water, 2 tablespoons of besan, 1 green chilli, bit of ginger, salt and sbout 3-4 heaping tablespoonfuls of sugar. Boil it. Tadka of ghee, jeera, cloves, cinnamon stick, curry leaves. Garnish with coriander. This is a proper sweet kadhi but absolutely delicious! Lemme know if you like it.

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    1. Duncan says thanks :) and thank YOU for the recipe, I will give it a try. 3-4 tbsp sugar eh?? So that's the secret ;)

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    2. After reading this post, I craved for Khadi and made the above recipe in Instant pot. It turned out super yummy. Few changes I made - just 1 teaspoon of sugar and added baked cauliflower balls at the end. Turned out lip smacking good. Adding bonus was no baby sitting while making khadi!. Thanks for sharing the recipe and Nupur, for writing this post :)

      Sushma

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  11. The worried expression...priceless! And him next to Niam gives us an idea of just how big he is. Sadly we have never had a pet and unlikely to get one as they are a huge responsibility. My children however can do what they want, when they get their own homes though.

    I really like kadhi but somehow mine always turns out mildly disappointing. Will try your version.

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    1. Ammani- Yes, he's a big boy but a gentle giant! You are right that it is a big responsibility, akin to having another child. Well, not as hard but they don't ever grow up and get their own place, know what I mean? My husband's parents never had a pet and the minute he moved into his first apartment as a grad student, he went out and adopted a dog (Dalu, our first dog) :) I personally cannot imagine life without a dog.

      Do try this kadhi and tell me what you think!

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  12. Making kadhi seems nerve wracking somehow. Aai's warnings of don't do xyz nahitar kadhi faatel has added to this anxiety. I have attempted many complicated dishes so it's time I get over my kadhi phobia.
    Duncan is so adorable! He looks like a gentle giant. Niam's toddler speak is so sweet. Looks like they are going to be besties for a long time.

    We don't have any pets. Had one or two fish for a year but, don't have any now. My brother-in-law lives close by and has a rescue dog too. So we get our doggie fix through him.

    -Anu

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    1. Anu- Kadhi really isn't that tricky and I honestly haven't had any trouble with yogurt splitting even when I am paying no special attention to the kadhi. Use enough besan to hold it together, that's all. Yes, Duncan and the kids are very close, a gang of three running around the house. Glad you have a doggy "nephew" in your life :)

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  13. I absolutely LOVE kadhi-bhaat, esp on a chilly winter evening, but I am super phobic to the yogurt separating. My mom used to make this awesome version where the main taste was from jeera and lot of ginger and very less besan. It was a thinner version of kadhi and absolutely divine. Another favorite is kadhi pakoda made the punjabi style. So indulgent and yummy.
    Dunkie is super adorable. My 4 year old has been pestering me for a pet. He is super obsessed about dogs and I know he would love the company. But I am doubtful about the additional workload it might generate in an already hectic schedule!

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    1. Neha- I will have to try the thinner version of kadhi! Would be nice to sip on it on a chilly day. The pakoda version is fantastic, I make it at times using the appey pan to make pakodas that don't need deep frying.

      Yes, dogs and kids make wonderful companions for each other. Hope your little boy can find a neighbor's dog to hang out with, or perhaps you guys could volunteer with a pet shelter if there is one nearby (or care for some strays).

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  14. Hi Nupur - am follow your posts often - since Dale was the only kid on the block, I just love the warm vibes of it! I've had 2 kids of my own, and your blog was a go-to place when I marathi food cravings during my 1st pregnancy. Duncan is the gentlest dog i've seen! As for the Kadhi - stir fried bhendi goes very well in it, so do big chunks of bottle gourd, squash, pumpkin and snake gourd. Leafy greens like palak, radish leaves and even kale works - though i'd prefer the kadhi to be a little watered down, and not very thick.

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    1. Hi Snehal- Thanks for reading this blog all these years :) YES how did I forget bhindi kadhi? And radish kadhi is wonderful too. Ooh I must try the greens next time. Thanks for all the wonderful suggestions.

      Duncan is very sweet and gentle. He has converted dozens of people from dog haters to dog lovers. I notice that he makes people of all ages melt, it is very cute.

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  15. I make an Andhra version with slightly diluted yogurt and a handful of soaked Chana dal as the thickening agent. It is flavored with a paste of the soaked Chana dal; corriander, cumin and mustard seeds; fresh green chilies, cilantro, ginger and a little bit of coconut. Tempered with just mustard seeds and curry leaves. Bottle gourd works very well in this kadhi. Give it a shot, tastes wonderful and does not appear to separate as easily as the besan versions.

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    1. Anu- That sounds absolutely wonderful, I'll give it a try for sure. I've never made the chana dal paste instead of besan version. I see many kadhis in my future.

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  16. Oh how Duncan has grown (and how time has flown!)..So lovely to see these pics, Nupur!

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    1. Thanks Lavanya :) Yes, Duncan has grown. And grown some more LOL

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  17. Reading this post and especially going back to read the pithale post from the comments section , a long standing doubt of mine has finally been resolved 🤔

    In tambram households like ours , pitla as it is called ,is a close cousin of sambar.It has toor dal and tamarind and It involves veggies like bittergourd, banana flower , eggplant and also has channa sometimes. But the key is a ground paste made of roasted channa dal , coconut, coriander seeds , red chillies.

    Watching this show ( raja ,rasoi aur Anya kahaniyan ) on Netflix , there's a lot about how sambar itself was a result of maratha influences on southern cooking. So clearly the Marathi pithale and our pitla are closely related.

    Dunkie is well so dunkable-in-sugar-syrup cute and that pic of him with Niam is too adorable for words.

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